An overhead of Ornamental Squash Fright

Ornamental Squash ‘Fright’

Cucurbita pepo

Features

  • Easy to grow
  • Heat-loving
  • Vine

Description

Large, round fruits are a rich pumpkin-orange with a very pronounced, warty texture. This unique variety is great for decorating.

Details

Plant type: annual
Spread: 6 to 8 ft
Site: full sun
Days to maturity: 90 days
Plant spacing: 18 to 36 in
Pinch: not necessary

Seed Sowing & Growing Notes

Sow seed indoors 3 weeks before last frost. Plant 2 seeds per 4-in pot and transplant them outside after all danger of frost has passed. Seeds can also be direct-sown into the garden after all danger of frost has passed.

Harvesting/Vase Life

Harvest before the first frost arrives and when the stems begin to turn brown and the rind takes on dullness. Cut the stems with a knife or pruning shears rather than pulling fruits off the vine. If you’re not using them right away, clean freshly harvested fruit with a 10-percent bleach-to-water solution and place them out on tables in the garage, shed, or greenhouse (if you have one) to dry. Cure them for 2 to 3 weeks in a warm, dark place, then use the fruit for creating beautiful displays. If properly cured, most squash will last at least 3 months, but don’t be surprised if they persist even longer.

Details

Description

Large, round fruits are a rich pumpkin-orange with a very pronounced, warty texture. This unique variety is great for decorating.

Details

Plant type: annual
Spread: 6 to 8 ft
Site: full sun
Days to maturity: 90 days
Plant spacing: 18 to 36 in
Pinch: not necessary

Seed Sowing & Growing Notes

Sow seed indoors 3 weeks before last frost. Plant 2 seeds per 4-in pot and transplant them outside after all danger of frost has passed. Seeds can also be direct-sown into the garden after all danger of frost has passed.

Harvesting/Vase Life

Harvest before the first frost arrives and when the stems begin to turn brown and the rind takes on dullness. Cut the stems with a knife or pruning shears rather than pulling fruits off the vine. If you’re not using them right away, clean freshly harvested fruit with a 10-percent bleach-to-water solution and place them out on tables in the garage, shed, or greenhouse (if you have one) to dry. Cure them for 2 to 3 weeks in a warm, dark place, then use the fruit for creating beautiful displays. If properly cured, most squash will last at least 3 months, but don’t be surprised if they persist even longer.

Sources

How to Grow

Seed-Saving Mini Course

Learn how to save seed from zinnia, dahlia, and celosia

In our upcoming free, three-part video series, you’ll learn everything you need to know to save seeds on a home scale, including how plants are pollinated and isolation techniques to ensure varieties come back true, how to tell when plants are ready to pick and how to harvest the seeds, and how to properly dry, clean, and store seeds long term.