An overhead of Ornamental Squash Fright

Ornamental Squash ‘Fright’

Cucurbita pepo

Features

  • Easy to grow
  • Heat-loving
  • Vine

Description

Large, round fruits are a rich pumpkin-orange with a very pronounced, warty texture. This unique variety is great for decorating.

Details

Plant type: annual
Spread: 6 to 8 ft
Site: full sun
Days to maturity: 90 days
Plant spacing: 18 to 36 in
Pinch: not necessary

Seed Sowing & Growing Notes

Sow seed indoors 3 weeks before last frost. Plant 2 seeds per 4-in pot and transplant them outside after all danger of frost has passed. Seeds can also be direct-sown into the garden after all danger of frost has passed.

Harvesting/Vase Life

Harvest before the first frost arrives and when the stems begin to turn brown and the rind takes on dullness. Cut the stems with a knife or pruning shears rather than pulling fruits off the vine. If you’re not using them right away, clean freshly harvested fruit with a 10-percent bleach-to-water solution and place them out on tables in the garage, shed, or greenhouse (if you have one) to dry. Cure them for 2 to 3 weeks in a warm, dark place, then use the fruit for creating beautiful displays. If properly cured, most squash will last at least 3 months, but don’t be surprised if they persist even longer.

Details

Description

Large, round fruits are a rich pumpkin-orange with a very pronounced, warty texture. This unique variety is great for decorating.

Details

Plant type: annual
Spread: 6 to 8 ft
Site: full sun
Days to maturity: 90 days
Plant spacing: 18 to 36 in
Pinch: not necessary

Seed Sowing & Growing Notes

Sow seed indoors 3 weeks before last frost. Plant 2 seeds per 4-in pot and transplant them outside after all danger of frost has passed. Seeds can also be direct-sown into the garden after all danger of frost has passed.

Harvesting/Vase Life

Harvest before the first frost arrives and when the stems begin to turn brown and the rind takes on dullness. Cut the stems with a knife or pruning shears rather than pulling fruits off the vine. If you’re not using them right away, clean freshly harvested fruit with a 10-percent bleach-to-water solution and place them out on tables in the garage, shed, or greenhouse (if you have one) to dry. Cure them for 2 to 3 weeks in a warm, dark place, then use the fruit for creating beautiful displays. If properly cured, most squash will last at least 3 months, but don’t be surprised if they persist even longer.

Sources

How to Grow