An overhead of Peony Nick Shaylor

Peony ‘Nick Shaylor’

Description

This variety is one of the very first peonies I ever planted. Its dark green foliage has a purple cast and is topped with blush buds that open to reveal large, pillowy soft pink blooms. Its soft pink coloring, and pure, perfect form make it ideal for wedding work.

Details

Height: 36 in
Type: full double
Bloom time: late
Site: full sun

Harvesting/Vase Life

For the best vase life, harvest peonies while in bud or “soft marshmallow” stage. Gently squeeze each flower bud, feeling for sponginess. If buds are still hard, then leave them to ripen longer, but if they feel soft—similar to a marshmallow—pick them. When harvesting, be sure to leave at least 2 sets of leaves on the stem so that the plant can continue to grow and store food over the summer.

Cut stems can also be stored for later use; they will last for 2 to 3 weeks in the refrigerator. When storing, remove almost all of the leaves; bunch the stems together, and slip them into a plastic bag with a few paper towels inside to absorb any excess moisture. Lay them flat on the shelf in the produce area of the fridge and then check every few days for signs of mold. Discard any that begin to rot. Upon removal, the flowers often look limp but don’t worry. Recut the stems and place them immediately in warm water with flower preservative. The buds will open within 24 hours, and the blooms will last a good week in the vase.

Details

Description

This variety is one of the very first peonies I ever planted. Its dark green foliage has a purple cast and is topped with blush buds that open to reveal large, pillowy soft pink blooms. Its soft pink coloring, and pure, perfect form make it ideal for wedding work.

Details

Height: 36 in
Type: full double
Bloom time: late
Site: full sun

Harvesting/Vase Life

For the best vase life, harvest peonies while in bud or “soft marshmallow” stage. Gently squeeze each flower bud, feeling for sponginess. If buds are still hard, then leave them to ripen longer, but if they feel soft—similar to a marshmallow—pick them. When harvesting, be sure to leave at least 2 sets of leaves on the stem so that the plant can continue to grow and store food over the summer.

Cut stems can also be stored for later use; they will last for 2 to 3 weeks in the refrigerator. When storing, remove almost all of the leaves; bunch the stems together, and slip them into a plastic bag with a few paper towels inside to absorb any excess moisture. Lay them flat on the shelf in the produce area of the fridge and then check every few days for signs of mold. Discard any that begin to rot. Upon removal, the flowers often look limp but don’t worry. Recut the stems and place them immediately in warm water with flower preservative. The buds will open within 24 hours, and the blooms will last a good week in the vase.

Sources

How to Grow

Seed-Saving Mini Course

Learn how to save seed from zinnia, dahlia, and celosia

In our upcoming free, three-part video series, you’ll learn everything you need to know to save seeds on a home scale, including how plants are pollinated and isolation techniques to ensure varieties come back true, how to tell when plants are ready to pick and how to harvest the seeds, and how to properly dry, clean, and store seeds long term.